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tsainta
Contributing Member

USA
1544 Posts

Posted - Jul 05 2014 :  6:16:42 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I've been on Spiriva since it was approved, but I've developed an odd problem with it over the past couple of years. If I take it daily as prescribed, after a month or two my breathing will tighten up within a couple of hours after I take it--rather than the general and gentle easing I normally experience. If I quit it for 10 days or two weeks my exercise tolerance falls off dramatically toward the end of the period, but my intolerance to the med disappears and I can start it up again with good effectiveness--until the intolerance reappears.

Anyone had a similar problem? Anyone discovered a better dosage schedule?

Tony-CA

The statistics on sanity say that one out of every four persons is suffering from some sort of mental illness. Think of your three best friends. Are they're OK? Then it's you.

Zellie
Member

USA
38 Posts

Posted - Jul 06 2014 :  10:35:38 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I feel better when I just take it every other day. I think that since it has such a long duration of effectiveness that it may just build up and your system. I also don't believe that one size fits all with medication.

Zell
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jmrommes
Contributing Member

1600 Posts

Posted - Jul 06 2014 :  11:28:15 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Tony, Zell's observation is a good one, and one that was raised with some of the most respected pulmos in the business at COPD7 in December, 2011 in Washington, DC. A female patient, who is probably 5'7" and maybe 130 soaking wet, explained that if she took Spiriva daily as prescribed, she had heart palpitations and generally felt very rocky, whereas if she took it every other day (I think she and her docs decided on a Monday, Wednesday Friday schedule), it did what it was supposed to do without the unpleasant side-effects. She made the point that, unlike many meds, Spiriva was the same dosage whether you were 5'0"-100 pounds or 6'8", 300 pounds. Several of the docs on the panel and in the room got that sort of stunned, "Oh, my God" look on their faces, whereas you could see the light bulbs going off in others. Either way, they got the point, and several of them said that they were going to discuss this possibility with their patients who complained of side-effects.

Jean

Exercise not only lets me live, it enables me to have a life.
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tsainta
Contributing Member

USA
1544 Posts

Posted - Jul 06 2014 :  11:35:39 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks. When I run into these things, I always have to wonder whether it's a unique thing, an interaction, or a common problem. I'll experiment.

Tony-CA

The statistics on sanity say that one out of every four persons is suffering from some sort of mental illness. Think of your three best friends. Are they're OK? Then it's you.
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CarolCA
Contributing Member

USA
3366 Posts

Posted - Jul 06 2014 :  2:52:37 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have heard of a number of people that take it every other day and it seems to work. Frankly, I have never had a prescription based on my weight which I thought was really something that should be done more. However, most the meds are not made in enough strengths to really do that. They do it with kids and the veternarians always do it but never with adults that I know of.
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Greg-TX
Member

200 Posts

Posted - Jul 06 2014 :  10:15:32 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I hope I don't offend anyone with this post. I guess I'm just a little (lot) negative and cynical in my mindset.

Do you think the pharmaceuticals really care. They want to sell as much as they can. And do you really think think the FDA really cares, the pharms have the FDA in their back pocket. The Docs get a kick back from the pharms for being a so called "consultant" who they pay big bucks to get them to prescribe their meds. For an example, they get free trips to the islands to attend a conference with their families to attend a ten minute presentation. The Phams pay them to write scripts whether you need them or not. So, "who's on first".

Our medical system is so broken and corrupt, along with our political systems, the average middle class Joe is just a pawn filling up their wallets.

We're just a bunch of Mullets swimming around a bunch of Sharks, i.e. insurance companies, doctors, hospitals and a rag tag government of in scrupulous bag men regulators.

So do you really think you might be getting a higher dose of Spriva that is actually needed and that your Doctor is really that concerned? If the script doesn't feel right to your body; listen to it.

Show me what's in your wallet!

Greg-TX
"Alcohol"- because no great story ever started with someone eating a salad!
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Sandyspen
Member

USA
246 Posts

Posted - Jul 07 2014 :  4:51:38 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I agree with everyone else. The first year or so on Spiriva, I took it daily...but gradually, I began to skip a day every now and then thinking I felt better that way.

Now, I usually take it every other day and skip the weekends. I thought it was just me, glad to know others are doing the same and we may be spot-on with our self-diagnosis.

Forgot to mention: I did say something about it to my Pulmo awhile back and he just said, "Well it is suppose to last 36 hours--" He didn't say if it was right/wrong. He was allright with it.

Sandy

~ Sandy
"Happiness" is not a destination--it's the trip!

Edited by - Sandyspen on Jul 07 2014 4:54:58 PM
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CarolCA
Contributing Member

USA
3366 Posts

Posted - Jul 07 2014 :  6:23:10 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Greg, I don't think the pharmaceutical companies are interested in anything but money but they do need a ton of it for developing different meds, many of which I find are just a duplication of something else but I disagree about the doctors. The doctors that I have had over the years are very cost conscious when it comes to prescribing drugs and I know they don't take fancy vacations if they even take one. I think they work very hard, have long days and really care. There are always exceptions but apparently I have had them all because I have never felt that way about any doctor I have had and in looking them up on the sites that tell what they get from pharmaceutical companies and other medical suppliers the most I have seen was a $200 dinner from any of them.
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Greg-TX
Member

200 Posts

Posted - Jul 07 2014 :  7:38:06 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
You are very, very fortunate Carol. I can't even find a GP that's taking on new patients.

You should check out the segment that aired not long ago on 60 minutes or 20/20 about the deceptive practices between physicians, the pharmaceuticals and even the medical schools. It will make the hair on the back of your neck stand up.

In a nut shell, we have an illness that there is no cure. We just have to learn to cope with that reality and take the meds given to help us to get through the day. This forum has given me more information about my symptoms, medications, education and understanding about this disease than any physician has ever given me. This forum has been a God send to me.

The first pulmonary doctor I saw that told me I had COPD, said I had a 50/50 chance of making it past five years and walked out the door; that was two years ago, so I guess we'll see.

I remember when I asked my first question on this forum and was so lost, scared and such a neophyte to this illness and it was such a relief to know other people are so kind to take the time to help others; especially putting up with our dumb questions. I do want to say a big thank you to all of the people on this site who share there knowledge and help. Thanks to all.


Greg-TX
"Alcohol"- because no great story ever started with someone eating a salad!
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CarolCA
Contributing Member

USA
3366 Posts

Posted - Jul 08 2014 :  12:34:52 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have been lucky. My Pulmo is my PCP and he is known as one of the most compassionate doctors at the hospital. He has been by doctor for 14 years now so he knows I am on the INTERNET and I can be a challenge at times but he handles it well. He is also the eternal optimist which works well with my pessimism. He has seen my thru some tough times. All my doctors are Indian now and they are all caring people that take time with their patients.
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Bo H
Contributing Member

USA
1118 Posts

Posted - Jul 08 2014 :  2:38:39 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Greg-TX The first pulmonary Dr. I saw said I had 4 years left in 1985. We only had Albuterol for out medicine then. I'm thankful for the cheating, scheming money hungry Pharmaceutical companies we have now. When Serevent came out in 1997 and I took my first dose I thought I had died and gone to heaven. It was the greatest thing since sliced bread. Sure, I don't like the high prices so I buy my meds from ADC but without the meds life is miserable.

Bo

Bo in Al
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Rita1
Senior Member

541 Posts

Posted - Jul 08 2014 :  8:57:30 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
When I pressed my pulmo for a better med for chronic bronchitis at my appointment last month, she told me that as recent as 20 years ago, pulmos would tell their newly copd dx patients, that they shouldn't smoke and give them the one inhalant that was available. She said that a lot of treatments have been developed and more are in the pipeline. Sadly for me though, she wasn't aware of any trials for treatments for chronic bronchitis or bronchiectasis which are my main problems. No coils, lvrs, nothing for mucus. But, she was optimistic that someone somewhere is working on it. So, hurray for the researchers at drug manufacturers, the docs willing to be involved in trials and especially to the guinea pigs - 4 legged and two legged - who test the treatments for us.
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Greg-TX
Member

200 Posts

Posted - Jul 08 2014 :  9:28:31 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Have any of you heard of a chain of new Pulmo, Asthma clinics called "Breath America", that supposedly specialize in COPD?

Greg-TX
"Alcohol"- because no great story ever started with someone eating a salad!
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CarolCA
Contributing Member

USA
3366 Posts

Posted - Jul 08 2014 :  9:40:12 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I used Medihaler Iso from 3M from 1980 to 2000 when they came out with the HFA. I couldn't take the propellant and I was totally addicted to the Medihaler as it really gave me a rush. There was another one called Alupent around that time. I doubt that is still around. They have overall developed some pretty good drugs for COPD over the last 14 years but many are just duplicates basically. I think Spiriva was the first to be entirely different.

I have not heard of those, Greg, but I bet they will make a lot of money since there is so much asthma these days.
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Greg-TX
Member

200 Posts

Posted - Jul 11 2014 :  4:57:19 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
You might be interested in knowing a new bill will go into affect in Sept. to report the monies and gifts given to physicians from the pharmaceutical companies. It's called the Sunshine Act. It's about time. Below is the article posted in our local paper today. Note: it reports that $20.4 Billion is spent by the pharms and med companies to the health care industry to promote their products in the form of perks and money given. Read on.

"WASHINGTON — When many of us have a medical appointment we’re con­cerned about our fi­nances: How much will we owe out of pocket? What’s our co-pay? But next time, you may also want to ask your doc­tors about their financial situation. That’s because nearly 95 percent of U.S. physi­cians accept gifts, meals, payments, travel and oth­er services from compa­nies that make the drugs and medical products they prescribe, according to the New England Jour­nal of Medicine. This has been a common practice for decades, and studies show it affects doctors’ prescribing decisions.

But for the first time, patients will soon be able draw back the curtain.

Starting in September, the federal government will make available an ex­haustive online database of payments to U.S. physi­cians and hospitals, under a section of the health care overhaul passed in 2010. The measure, known as the Sunshine Act, re­quires most makers of drugs and medical sup­plies to report all pay­ments, gifts and other ser­vices worth $10 or more that they provide to health professionals. “I think every patient out there should know who actually is paying their doctor,” says Paul Thacker, a fellow at Har­vard University’s Safra Center for Ethics. “The one thing we know is that money changes behavior and people tend to re­spond to who is giving them money.” As a Senate staffer, Thacker helped craft the disclosure rules, which are designed to lay bare the industry practice of “detailing,” in which com­pany salespeople court doctors with everything from pens and mugs to lu­crative speaking engage­ments. Pharmaceutical companies spend an esti­mated $20.4 billion on these activities each year and then track doctors’ prescribing patterns to gauge the return on their investment. Using a federal web­site, patients will be able to search most payments made to their health care provider, from $20 lunch bills to hundreds of thou­sands of dollars in con­sulting fees. Some of this information has already come out, mainly because of legal settlements that required drugmakers to disclose the information.

Websites such as Dol­lars for Docs, from the nonprofit journalism group ProPublica, pool this data and enable users to search doctors by name to see what payments they’ve received. The database covers 15 phar­maceutical companies and begins with payments made in 2009. But how is a layperson to make sense of it all? And how does one sepa­rate common medical practice from truly ques­tionable activity?........."

Greg-TX
"Alcohol"- because no great story ever started with someone eating a salad!
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Rita1
Senior Member

541 Posts

Posted - Jul 11 2014 :  7:23:38 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That's great new, Greg. My docs at Northwestern are required to list along with their online biographies any external relationships with any pharmaceutical, medical device, etc. companies, schools or any organization both compensated and uncompensated. I understand that it is necessary for docs to have relationships, e.g. for trials, but transparency is vital.

Rita
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Greg-TX
Member

200 Posts

Posted - Jul 13 2014 :  10:03:07 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Carol CA, why don't you check out your Doc. on the website and see what kickbacks he's been getting from the pharm companies for prescribing meds. You might really have one of the unscrupulous doctors out there.

Greg-TX
"Alcohol"- because no great story ever started with someone eating a salad!
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CarolCA
Contributing Member

USA
3366 Posts

Posted - Jul 13 2014 :  11:57:59 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I did long before you gave the link. He only had one dinner for a couple hundred dollars. Some of the other pulmonary docs had quite a few, especially one but he does a lot of speaking gigs and my doc doesn't do those. My doctor is unique in that he doesn't get involved in large medical groups and remains one of the few lone doctor offices. He is very independent and stays away from politics at the hospital. The ones that get the big bucks are the ones that work under the hospital group cause the is where the pharmacy companies would go to get the most bang for their buck.
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max
Member

41 Posts

Posted - Oct 28 2015 :  12:37:17 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I recently had pft.....I aasked for results and can not figure how bad I may be.....Dr said moderats....presceibed Anoro elliptal.....sems to be helping,I also use nebulizer and proair.....he also wants me to go to rehab.....I dod not think I can go much .....what should I expect?a;so I only have medicare,amd not able to pay what medicare doea not pay......maz
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PennyPA
Contributing Member

USA
5755 Posts

Posted - Oct 28 2015 :  11:18:57 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Max, did you get a copy of the results of your PFT? I believe Medicare will pay for the rehab. That way, you can get a start on the exercising you should be doing and then, when the medicare approved part of rehab is done, you can continue many of the exercises at home with a little adaptation.

****************************************************************
Do Not Regret Growing Older. It is a Privilege Denied to Many

You can’t change the past but you can ruin the present worrying about the future.

The Bad News: Time flies as you get older.
The Good News: You’re still the pilot.

Penny's Lung Volume Reduction Surgery

And Our Travel Blog After LVRS




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LJ-MI
Rookie

USA
20 Posts

Posted - Oct 28 2015 :  2:13:01 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi,Max.. When I went to pulmonary rehab, Medicare paid all but 20%. Like you, I could not afford the 20% so I found ways to exercise at home and also just by walking as much as possible. I'm wondering, does your income qualify you for Medicaid or other assistance? Regardless, I'm thinking that the important thing is to keep moving.

Sometimes all I need is the air that I breathe..
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tsainta
Contributing Member

USA
1544 Posts

Posted - Oct 28 2015 :  3:11:55 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Pulmonary rehab has no magic about it. It is simply a supervised exercise program with some presentations about coping with COPD. Anyone can do the exercise on their own, and many of the non-aerobic exercises can be found through internet research, as can the material in the presentations. The program might include machines for the aerobic exercises, but there is nothing better than walking--no matter how slow--for aerobic exercise. All of this might be easier with supervision and a little external nudge here and there, but it's all available for free to anyone who is willing reach out for it.

Tony-CA

The statistics on sanity say that one out of every four persons is suffering from some sort of mental illness. Think of your three best friends. Are they're OK? Then it's you.
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msmaxie
Member

USA
30 Posts

Posted - Oct 29 2015 :  5:57:09 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I jumped online to re-order my inhaler from my Canadian Pharmacy and got this.....

Our records indicate that you paid for an order at NorthWestPharmacy.com with a credit card in the recent past.
After nearly a decade of processing credit cards without issue, we are no longer able to accept VISA or MasterCard credit cards because VISA has suddenly deemed that sites offering medicines which are imported into the United States to be outside of their "Global Brand Protection Program" requirements while MasterCard has implemented a similar approach.

We share the concern that rogue pharmacy merchants selling medicines without prescriptions and other controlled drugs should not be able to process credit cards. We are, however, very disappointed that VISA and MasterCard appear to be taking such a broad-brush approach which ultimately prevents their cardholders from using their credit cards to purchase non-controlled medicines with a legitimate prescription, just because those medicines are imported. We believe that VISA's and MasterCard's stance frustrates access to affordable healthcare and restricts consumer choice. We disagree that their approach protects their brands in any way and we believe that their approach only serves to benefit those with an interest in Americans paying more for their medicines.

Although I can still purchase my meds with a check it iritates me that I am inconvenienced by bureaucracy!
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PennyPA
Contributing Member

USA
5755 Posts

Posted - Oct 29 2015 :  6:21:17 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Wow!! I wonder if they're going to do that with ADC??

****************************************************************
Do Not Regret Growing Older. It is a Privilege Denied to Many

You can’t change the past but you can ruin the present worrying about the future.

The Bad News: Time flies as you get older.
The Good News: You’re still the pilot.

Penny's Lung Volume Reduction Surgery

And Our Travel Blog After LVRS




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Stubby8
Rookie

6 Posts

Posted - Oct 30 2015 :  2:30:44 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I just received a similarly-worded email from Inhouse. They now accept only e-check and Western Union Money Transfer from U.S. customers.
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PennyPA
Contributing Member

USA
5755 Posts

Posted - Oct 30 2015 :  6:01:34 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Guess I'll place my order with ADC and see what happens.

****************************************************************
Do Not Regret Growing Older. It is a Privilege Denied to Many

You can’t change the past but you can ruin the present worrying about the future.

The Bad News: Time flies as you get older.
The Good News: You’re still the pilot.

Penny's Lung Volume Reduction Surgery

And Our Travel Blog After LVRS




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muddleaged
Member

USA
36 Posts

Posted - Oct 31 2015 :  12:06:07 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Northwest Pharmacy sent me the same letter, and I contacted my visa card. They said they would accept bills. I wonder if Northwest Pharmacy just does not want to absorb the percentage that Visa charges.

Canadadrugstop.com accepts credit cards, as does ADC.

Back to the original topic. I've been taking spiriva for years, but have gone with the generic from a Canadian drugstore. I find it works as expected. I use an old spiriva handihaler instead of the device that comes with it. I did use the respimat for a few years as part of a drug trial. I did not like it.
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LJ-MI
Rookie

USA
20 Posts

Posted - Nov 01 2015 :  9:05:40 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Greg-TX

You might be interested in knowing a new bill will go into affect in Sept. to report the monies and gifts given to physicians from the pharmaceutical companies. It's called the Sunshine Act. It's about time. Below is the article posted in our local paper today. Note: it reports that $20.4 Billion is spent by the pharms and med companies to the health care industry to promote their products in the form of perks and money given. Read on.

"WASHINGTON — When many of us have a medical appointment we’re con­cerned about our fi­nances: How much will we owe out of pocket? What’s our co-pay? But next time, you may also want to ask your doc­tors about their financial situation. That’s because nearly 95 percent of U.S. physi­cians accept gifts, meals, payments, travel and oth­er services from compa­nies that make the drugs and medical products they prescribe, according to the New England Jour­nal of Medicine. This has been a common practice for decades, and studies show it affects doctors’ prescribing decisions.

But for the first time, patients will soon be able draw back the curtain.

Starting in September, the federal government will make available an ex­haustive online database of payments to U.S. physi­cians and hospitals, under a section of the health care overhaul passed in 2010. The measure, known as the Sunshine Act, re­quires most makers of drugs and medical sup­plies to report all pay­ments, gifts and other ser­vices worth $10 or more that they provide to health professionals. “I think every patient out there should know who actually is paying their doctor,” says Paul Thacker, a fellow at Har­vard University’s Safra Center for Ethics. “The one thing we know is that money changes behavior and people tend to re­spond to who is giving them money.” As a Senate staffer, Thacker helped craft the disclosure rules, which are designed to lay bare the industry practice of “detailing,” in which com­pany salespeople court doctors with everything from pens and mugs to lu­crative speaking engage­ments. Pharmaceutical companies spend an esti­mated $20.4 billion on these activities each year and then track doctors’ prescribing patterns to gauge the return on their investment. Using a federal web­site, patients will be able to search most payments made to their health care provider, from $20 lunch bills to hundreds of thou­sands of dollars in con­sulting fees. Some of this information has already come out, mainly because of legal settlements that required drugmakers to disclose the information.

Websites such as Dol­lars for Docs, from the nonprofit journalism group ProPublica, pool this data and enable users to search doctors by name to see what payments they’ve received. The database covers 15 phar­maceutical companies and begins with payments made in 2009. But how is a layperson to make sense of it all? And how does one sepa­rate common medical practice from truly ques­tionable activity?........."


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PennyPA
Contributing Member

USA
5755 Posts

Posted - Nov 02 2015 :  12:28:52 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I think they're talking about foreign pharmacies here, LJ. I believe that article pertains mostly to US pharmacies.

****************************************************************
Do Not Regret Growing Older. It is a Privilege Denied to Many

You can’t change the past but you can ruin the present worrying about the future.

The Bad News: Time flies as you get older.
The Good News: You’re still the pilot.

Penny's Lung Volume Reduction Surgery

And Our Travel Blog After LVRS




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LJ-MI
Rookie

USA
20 Posts

Posted - Nov 02 2015 :  3:14:30 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Penney.. Actually I was trying to respond to a post by Greg-TX regarding ProPublica and physician/gift transparency. I checked up on the pulmonologist who works out of our mid sized small city hospital and who I see as a patient, and his 'gifts' totaled $30,947 for 2013-2014. No, that's not a typo. I found this info to be very interesting as well as unsettling.

I checked on pulmonologists working out of other hospitals in a 10 county area and found the highest amount received was $957.00.
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DonnaB0216
Member

USA
95 Posts

Posted - Nov 03 2015 :  1:44:10 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I just left my pulmonologist's office with a prescription for Stiolto Respimat to replace the Spiriva and Symbicort. I have a noticed a lot of improvement from the Spiriva but here lately I get at least one "dud" a week. Hopefully I will know how well it works for me before the free sample runs out.

Donna
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PennyPA
Contributing Member

USA
5755 Posts

Posted - Nov 03 2015 :  4:36:55 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Well, just placed my annual order with ADC and no major problems. I mis-ordered last year and ran out of symbicort/advair about a month ago. I can surely feel the difference!

****************************************************************
Do Not Regret Growing Older. It is a Privilege Denied to Many

You can’t change the past but you can ruin the present worrying about the future.

The Bad News: Time flies as you get older.
The Good News: You’re still the pilot.

Penny's Lung Volume Reduction Surgery

And Our Travel Blog After LVRS




Go to Top of Page

Jan-KS
Member

USA
58 Posts

Posted - Nov 09 2015 :  01:43:32 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I've been on Spiriva for years and couldn't live without it. In fact on days where I'm really bad, I take a second one. I was also on Symbicort for a number of years and was very impressed with that drug as well but had to do 3 doses a day rather than two - then ask for a sample from my pulmonologist when I would run out too early - they were happy to provide it. I've since stopped taking the Symbicort and added two additional nebulized medications that work better than any inhaler I've ever used, but are very time consuming.

Jan C
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rosytomato
Contributing Member

USA
1309 Posts

Posted - Nov 09 2015 :  3:01:14 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Jan,

What two nebulized medications are you using in place of the inhalers?

rosy
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thj4586
Rookie

USA
1 Posts

Posted - Dec 07 2015 :  6:14:05 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by tsainta

I've been on Spiriva since it was approved, but I've developed an odd problem with it over the past couple of years. If I take it daily as prescribed, after a month or two my breathing will tighten up within a couple of hours after I take it--rather than the general and gentle easing I normally experience. If I quit it for 10 days or two weeks my exercise tolerance falls off dramatically toward the end of the period, but my intolerance to the med disappears and I can start it up again with good effectiveness--until the intolerance reappears.

Anyone had a similar problem? Anyone discovered a better dosage schedule?


Terri from AL
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jmrommes
Contributing Member

1600 Posts

Posted - Dec 07 2015 :  8:15:44 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Donna, please realize that you won't have the inhaled steroid component present in symbicort with the Stiolto. You may want to get a separate inhaled steroid to replace it.

Jean

Exercise not only lets me live, it enables me to have a life.
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DonnaB0216
Member

USA
95 Posts

Posted - Dec 08 2015 :  10:17:27 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Jean, the Stiolto didn't work nearly as well as the Spiriva. Luckily, I have several refills left on the Spiriva. I'm ok with trying different things but if it ain't broke don't fix it! Spiriva works for me. The pharmacist told me that they are moving towards a delivery system similar to the Stiolto for Spiriva.

Also, on an entirely different note...Do any of you wear dentures and have a problem with the powdery type meds (like Spiriva and especially Advair) sticking to your dentures?

Donna
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Bo H
Contributing Member

USA
1118 Posts

Posted - Dec 08 2015 :  10:50:50 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Donna, I remove my dentures before I take any inhaled meds. I really can't tell any difference but I just want to be sure I get as much of the med as possible.

Bo in Al
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hamtol
Member

USA
276 Posts

Posted - Dec 27 2015 :  2:17:02 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I tried to utilize ADC, but could not because they do not take Master Card. I even called and when they called back, I was told that they only accept Visa. That was in October, 2015. I am waiting for my Visa debit card to arrive so I can order my meds. I have insurance, but have a 2 grand deductible to meet before they pay for my meds. Gus
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Dave-OH
Administrator

USA
3873 Posts

Posted - Dec 27 2015 :  2:53:28 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Buy a pre-paid Visa at a store and use that just for ADC. It is safer. Just put enough plus a bit on the card at a time.

Dave, Forum Administrator
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Bo H
Contributing Member

USA
1118 Posts

Posted - Dec 27 2015 :  5:20:24 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hamtol, I just placed an order from ADC and now they don't take VISA, I had to use an E check.

Bo in Al
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