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Nikilet
Member

USA
48 Posts

Posted - Apr 20 2015 :  4:54:19 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yes, I have an oximeter. I wear my oxygen all of the time, even in the shower. If I am just sitting quietly, watching TV, it will record anywhere between 95 to 98. However, if I get up and walk the 20 feet to my bathroom, by the time I get back to my chair it can be quite low. Last night, for instance, it was only 84 by the time I got back to being seated, and whereas it will usually rise quite fast, it took several minutes for it to get back up to 93.
quote:
Originally posted by Helen-CO

You do have an oximeter, right Nikilet? I like to keep my 02 level around 95--which requires 6 liters for exercise (and is encouraged by my pulmo dr). I think the reason I have heart problems now is from inadequate oxygen prior to supplemental 02.

p.s. Good videos, Dave. The 1st is quite clever.

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Nikilet
Member

USA
48 Posts

Posted - Apr 20 2015 :  5:03:40 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I heard this from an acquaintance who is a registered nurse (for over 30 years) and from two different people employed by my oxygen supplier. I have never asked my doctor if it can be turned up but I will do that.

I did find this though, which seems to substantiate the information given me:
However, acute respiratory failure from COPD is a special case because uncontrolled administration of oxygen in this condition may cause acute hypoventilation and carbon dioxide retention with dire consequences including coma following CO2 narcosis. This physiology was described 50 years ago as a risk factor for patients with COPD who have chronic hypercapnia and hypercarbia. The recommendation (then, as now) is to limit oxygen administration to the minimum needed to raise arterial oxygen saturation to a level that provides adequate oxygen delivery to tissues (88%-92%), and no higher.

quote:
Originally posted by PennyPA

That's an old, old wive's tale, Nikilet. Where did you hear that? Just ask your doctor and see what he says. And you might tell your delivery guy that he shouldn't be telling people this since it is totally untrue.

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Nikilet
Member

USA
48 Posts

Posted - Apr 20 2015 :  5:05:49 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I did find an article that indicated levels of 2-3 for copd patients.

quote:
Originally posted by CarolCA

You might ask him then why do the machines go to 5 liters and some go to 10. Even my nursing friends have said the same thing to me as they were taught that 3 was the highest a COPD patient could go. They insisted that the people I know that are higher than that have other lung diseases. I am not sure they believed me but they are all retired now so I guess it is a moot point. I do have one friend that works still in hospice and keep forgetting to ask her.

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PennyPA
Contributing Member

USA
5893 Posts

Posted - Apr 20 2015 :  6:39:18 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

I did find this though, which seems to substantiate the information given me:
However, acute respiratory failure from COPD is a special case because uncontrolled administration of oxygen in this condition may cause acute hypoventilation and carbon dioxide retention with dire consequences including coma following CO2 narcosis. This physiology was described 50 years ago as a risk factor for patients with COPD who have chronic hypercapnia and hypercarbia. Have you been told you have chroic hypercapnia or hypercarbia? The recommendation (then, as now) is to limit oxygen administration to the minimum needed to raise arterial oxygen saturation to a level that provides adequate oxygen delivery to tissues (88%-92%), and no higher. Since you're not keeping your O2 level at 88 or 92%, it seems prudent for you to raise your O2 a notch or two to keep it there on a constant basis. Talk to your doctor!

And where did you read this information?


****************************************************************
Do Not Regret Growing Older. It is a Privilege Denied to Many

You can’t change the past but you can ruin the present worrying about the future.

The Bad News: Time flies as you get older.
The Good News: You’re still the pilot.

Penny's Lung Volume Reduction Surgery

And Our Travel Blog After LVRS





Edited by - PennyPA on Apr 21 2015 12:13:41 AM
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Nikilet
Member

USA
48 Posts

Posted - Apr 20 2015 :  10:50:43 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I found the info online today on a medical site. Wish I would have copied the link now, but I didn't.

quote:
Originally posted by PennyPA



I did find this though, which seems to substantiate the information given me:
However, acute respiratory failure from COPD is a special case because uncontrolled administration of oxygen in this condition may cause acute hypoventilation and carbon dioxide retention with dire consequences including coma following CO2 narcosis. This physiology was described 50 years ago as a risk factor for patients with COPD who have chronic hypercapnia and hypercarbia. Have you been told you have chroic hypercapnia or hypercarbia? The recommendation (then, as now) is to limit oxygen administration to the minimum needed to ]red]raise arterial oxygen saturation to a level that provides adequate oxygen delivery to tissues (88%-92%), and no higher.[/red] Since you're not keeping your O2 level at 88 or 92%, it seems prudent for you to raise your O2 a notch or two to keep it there on a constant basis. Talk to your doctor!

And where did you read this information?



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Nikilet
Member

USA
48 Posts

Posted - Apr 20 2015 :  10:52:56 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I really appreciate all this input and am taking it all in. I do plan to ask my doctor about a few things the next time I see him.

quote:
Originally posted by PennyPA



I did find this though, which seems to substantiate the information given me:
However, acute respiratory failure from COPD is a special case because uncontrolled administration of oxygen in this condition may cause acute hypoventilation and carbon dioxide retention with dire consequences including coma following CO2 narcosis. This physiology was described 50 years ago as a risk factor for patients with COPD who have chronic hypercapnia and hypercarbia. Have you been told you have chroic hypercapnia or hypercarbia? The recommendation (then, as now) is to limit oxygen administration to the minimum needed to ]red]raise arterial oxygen saturation to a level that provides adequate oxygen delivery to tissues (88%-92%), and no higher.[/red] Since you're not keeping your O2 level at 88 or 92%, it seems prudent for you to raise your O2 a notch or two to keep it there on a constant basis. Talk to your doctor!

And where did you read this information?



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Beth - La
Rookie

USA
24 Posts

Posted - Apr 21 2015 :  08:55:26 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Nikilet. I hope you are feeling better today.

I too recently read something similar to what you mentioned, and it was regarding emergency oxygen administration in acutely breathless patients, in stages from pre-hospital to the admission. In other words, it is a guideline used by paramedics and/or emergency room staff UNTIL blood gas readings are available. While I am also interested in discussing this with my doctor, I don't think it is meant to advise the at home patients that are under a doctors care.

For patients with known COPD, it is not desirable to exceed an oxygen saturation of 93%. In these cases, oxygen therapy should be commenced at approximately 40% (FiO 2 0.4) and titrated upwards if saturation falls below 90% and down-wards if the patient becomes drowsy or if the saturation exceeds 93–94%

I will link the site where I found this, if allowed, but keep in mind that it was written in 2008, and I've only had 2 sips of coffee so I haven't looked for further more updated info.
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/9780470757437.app4/pdf


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Sam-Tx
Senior Member

597 Posts

Posted - Apr 21 2015 :  3:40:02 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Just one experienced opinion, Beth. The part you have highlighted in red is ABSOLUTE NONSENSE! I have very very severe COPD now. I keep my oxygen as high as I can and do much better. For anyone using a nasal cannula you cannot breath in too much oxygen for your body. With your oximeter, keep your level as high as you can (96-98).
The primary reason I'm still here and mobile is because I deliberately keep it as high as I possibly can. That statement in red is a fifty year old unproven theory that people who don't have COPD keep teaching to people who don't have COPD. If you are on a nasal cannula and not a full closed face mask, you cannot get too much oxygen into your bloodstream.
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Dave-OH
Administrator

USA
4138 Posts

Posted - Apr 21 2015 :  3:49:22 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Folks, I think that is a clinical note to Emergency Medical Workers in "Safe Transfer and Retrieval: The Practical Approach, Second Edition"

The book description on Pub Med

quote:
If you have ever cared anxiously for a patient in the back of an ambulance you will recognize the need for STaR—Safe Transfer and Retrieval. Ideally, everyone who supervises patient transfers—whether from community to hospital, from department to department, from hospital to hospital, or even from country to country—should do the STaR course for which Safe Transfer and Retrieval is the core text. Aimed at paramedics as well as hospital professionals, the book describes a systematic approach to patient transfer, ACCEPT—assessment, control, communication, evaluation, preparation/packaging and transport—and offers practical tips on such matters as the use of radios, troubles with medical equipment, and lifting/handling techniques. Management of trauma (including burns) and of medical and paediatric disorders is discussed in terms of specific pathophysiological processes. The book also advises on medicolegal issues, staff and patient safety, and documentation. As with all publications from the Advanced Life Support Group, key information is summarized in boxes, for review at a glance. This is a great book—essential reading if you are closely involved with patient transfers and have not done the STaR course.


from Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine


This was not meant as patient advice, but for EMT and Para-Medics in transport. This is a short term situation, and recommends the O2 level to use while in an ambulance

We need to be careful when finding sources to understand the focus of the advice. This is an extremely focused resource for a specific community.

In our own case, our medical team is the resource to consider on topics like this. There are resources for patients, those for doctors and those for other medical professionals. Even the resources for primary care and specialists can vary, based on the training level of the doctor.







Dave, Forum Administrator
COPD Support, Inc. http://www.copd-support.com/
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My Site: http://lungresources.com
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Nikilet
Member

USA
48 Posts

Posted - Apr 21 2015 :  4:55:25 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I am appreciating all the information I'm receiving. It gives a place of reference. I don't expect anyone to "stand behind" the information they are posting. I'm asking questions and people are just sharing what they might have read, heard or what might have happened to them through their own personal experience.

Could I ask Sam-Tx, how high, then, do you have your oxygen or concentrator set?
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Sam-Tx
Senior Member

597 Posts

Posted - Apr 22 2015 :  10:20:42 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nikilet, over the years (15) I have increased oxygen as I felt I needed to (normally with Dr.'s consent) in order to maintain good oxygen numbers with the oximeters. Now have a 10 lpm concentrator and keep it about 7 with a fifty foot hose. Without the hose restriction, it would go up to a flow rate about 9. So, I keep mine at 7 lpm.
Two years ago a pulmonogist in a hospital that did not know me or my records nearly killed me following that old advise. I'm very careful what I accept as gospel from doctors.
It's my opinion that the reason so many of us lose muscle when we get copd is because the muscles do not get a sufficient supply of oxygen from our blood. All of our body organs need oxygen to operate. The reason we need to exercise more is to rebuild muscle that we have lost from lack of oxygen supply. So, I want as much oxygen as possible circulating in my blood. Just an opinion.
Sam
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Sokcap48
Senior Member

USA
888 Posts

Posted - Apr 22 2015 :  1:56:10 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nikilet-I also have increased alittle over the2-3 years I have been on O2. I use a meter but I also go by how I am feeling. I used to be fine at 2 all the time now 2 is ok for sitting but up and doing house work etc. ( yes men really do house work :-) ) I am at 3 and on the treadmill I go to four. Pulmo knows and says it is fine.
Like if I am vacuuming and feel I need more I turn it up. I find I feel better. If I have the " right " amount of O2 I don't get as " huffy/puffy".

Paul-Ut
The Journey Continues.
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PennyPA
Contributing Member

USA
5893 Posts

Posted - Apr 22 2015 :  5:08:37 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I like that saying, Paul..."huffy/puffy".

****************************************************************
Do Not Regret Growing Older. It is a Privilege Denied to Many

You can’t change the past but you can ruin the present worrying about the future.

The Bad News: Time flies as you get older.
The Good News: You’re still the pilot.

Penny's Lung Volume Reduction Surgery

And Our Travel Blog After LVRS




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Nikilet
Member

USA
48 Posts

Posted - Apr 27 2015 :  12:18:40 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I was cleaning house yesterday and decided to turn my oxygen up a little to see what happened because I do struggle quite severely when I'm being that active. I only turned it up from 2 to 2-1/2. I could really feel that there was more oxygen coming through my cannula.

However, after probably 2 hours I turned it back down because it was not helping me. In fact, it seemed to be making things worse. I'm not sure how to describe it, but it almost felt like I was trying to hyperventilate, or something.

I'm going to be sure and let my doctor know when I talk to him, but would appreciate comments from those on the forum about this. I was surprised because I thought it would help.
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jmrommes
Contributing Member

1895 Posts

Posted - Apr 27 2015 :  07:34:32 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Turning up your O2 when your sats are good doesn't do you any good, and may do harm. If they're down, like below 88 and you turn it up while you're exerting yourself, you should turn it back down when you're done with the activity. I'm definitely a person who believes in titrating my own O2, but doing that means you DON'T turn your O2 up when your sats are fine.

Jean

Exercise not only lets me live, it enables me to have a life.
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Sokcap48
Senior Member

USA
888 Posts

Posted - Apr 27 2015 :  08:57:06 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Penny-the reason it is in " " is my wife and I where hiking in one of the National Parks and she turned and said stop you are getting to " Huffy-Puffy ". And that has stuck. :-). Yes I think it is pretty good description.

Paul-Ut
The Journey Continues.
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Sokcap48
Senior Member

USA
888 Posts

Posted - Apr 27 2015 :  09:03:43 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nikilet- yes when I stop working, I turn mine back down before I sit down, when active I drop so it goes back up.

Paul-Ut
The Journey Continues.
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Nikilet
Member

USA
48 Posts

Posted - Apr 27 2015 :  8:28:07 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
My stats were not fine when turned my O2 up. I was cleaning and they were down. That's why I was so amazed that it didn't help but rather seemed to make me feel more breathless.

quote:
Originally posted by jmrommes

Turning up your O2 when your sats are good doesn't do you any good, and may do harm. If they're down, like below 88 and you turn it up while you're exerting yourself, you should turn it back down when you're done with the activity. I'm definitely a person who believes in titrating my own O2, but doing that means you DON'T turn your O2 up when your sats are fine.

Jean

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CarolCA
Contributing Member

USA
3366 Posts

Posted - Apr 27 2015 :  10:27:40 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
My guess is that you were not exhaling well and were perhaps even holding your breath without realizing it. A half liter increase would not be enough for you to be retaining CO2 unless you were not exhaling correctly. I find I tend to hold my breath when I am doing some household chores or things that are more active.
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PennyPA
Contributing Member

USA
5893 Posts

Posted - Apr 27 2015 :  10:51:09 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I doubt you'd feel much difference between 2 and 2 1/2 coming through the cannula. I've been on O2 for 11 years (only at night and altitudes since 2008) and I can't tell much of a difference. Did you do the same strenuous work for 2 hours? Or did you sit down for awhile? What were your sats before you turned it up?

****************************************************************
Do Not Regret Growing Older. It is a Privilege Denied to Many

You can’t change the past but you can ruin the present worrying about the future.

The Bad News: Time flies as you get older.
The Good News: You’re still the pilot.

Penny's Lung Volume Reduction Surgery

And Our Travel Blog After LVRS




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Nikilet
Member

USA
48 Posts

Posted - Apr 28 2015 :  6:37:52 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
When I am cleaning, I do just a little and then have to take a rest in the form of perhaps just leaning against the table for a bit. Sometimes the rest periods are longer than the activity period was. It takes me a long time to get through a room because of this. Do either of you (CarolCA or PennyPA) think that I should turn my oxygen up a full level and see what happens?

As to holding my breath, that is entirely possible. When I get real short I tense up my shoulders and sometimes really struggle.

I do practice pursed lip breathing a lot. It has become kind of a habit so I don't know about the possibility of not exhaling well enough. I guess I wasn't paying strict attention to all these little things. I just know I definitely felt strange and the only way I could think to describe it was hyperventilating.
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PennyPA
Contributing Member

USA
5893 Posts

Posted - Apr 28 2015 :  10:43:24 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hyperventilating is when you breath in and out rapidly and therefore get very little CO2 out before you're taking your next breath in. So, if you think it's because you're hyperventilating, consciously slow your breathing and really concentrate on nice long exhales. I rarely use O2 since my LVRS but many people are prescribed 1 or 2 liters more while active than while just sitting. It really depends on what your pulse oximeter says. If you are using being sob as a guideline, you could be adding more O2 when your saturation levels are really okay. Why do you have to take a rest...sob or tired muscles? And many of us start wearing our shoulders around our ears when we get sob. Catch yourself when you do that and put those shoulders back where they belong. I used to do that while in rehab at Duke before my LVRS (we had to walk the track) and other copders would remind me to drop my shoulders as I was walking.

****************************************************************
Do Not Regret Growing Older. It is a Privilege Denied to Many

You can’t change the past but you can ruin the present worrying about the future.

The Bad News: Time flies as you get older.
The Good News: You’re still the pilot.

Penny's Lung Volume Reduction Surgery

And Our Travel Blog After LVRS




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Nikilet
Member

USA
48 Posts

Posted - Apr 28 2015 :  11:45:36 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have to take rests because of sob, severe sob. And I know that I do hunch up and tighten my shoulders when I have severe trouble.
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CarolCA
Contributing Member

USA
3366 Posts

Posted - Apr 29 2015 :  01:39:20 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
You need to talk to your doctor about raising it. I would say raising it a liter would be reasonable but you comments about feeling like you are hyperventilating makes me wary so that is why I would talk to you doctor. The first time I had hypercapnia I wasn 't on oxygen and it felt like I was hyperventilating so best to check it out. Do you have Emphysema? Or on you have something else like a restrictive disease?
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DonnaB0216
Member

USA
95 Posts

Posted - Apr 29 2015 :  08:25:07 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Obviously this isn't medical advice. It is, however, what works for me. When I get that feeling like I am hyperventilating I rub some mentholatum on my hands and cover my face and try to calm down and breathe evenly. I don't know if the mentholatum works or is a relaxing smell that reminds me of the days my grandmother would rub it on my chest.

Donna
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PennyPA
Contributing Member

USA
5893 Posts

Posted - Apr 29 2015 :  11:39:59 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
No, no, no, Donna. It may work for you but mentholatum is NOT good for a person with copd to cover their face with. First of all, people with copd have too much co2 to start with so they should never use breathing into a brown paper bag nor should they cover their face with their hands. They need to get rid of the CO2 so they have to concentrate on exhaling longer and getting rid of the co2. Second of all, mentholatum contains oils which should not be inhaled close-up by a person with copd (or anyone, I guess) for fear of lipid pneumonia. The reason you felt the mentholatum worked is because you covered your face with your hands. Had you done the same thing without the mentho, you would have gotten the same result.

****************************************************************
Do Not Regret Growing Older. It is a Privilege Denied to Many

You can’t change the past but you can ruin the present worrying about the future.

The Bad News: Time flies as you get older.
The Good News: You’re still the pilot.

Penny's Lung Volume Reduction Surgery

And Our Travel Blog After LVRS




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Nikilet
Member

USA
48 Posts

Posted - Apr 29 2015 :  6:16:21 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I had to look up the terms you used. The only thing I was told is that I have a combination of emphysema and chronic bronchitis, or COPD. Those were his words when I was first diagnosed.

quote:
Originally posted by CarolCA

You need to talk to your doctor about raising it. I would say raising it a liter would be reasonable but you comments about feeling like you are hyperventilating makes me wary so that is why I would talk to you doctor. The first time I had hypercapnia I wasn 't on oxygen and it felt like I was hyperventilating so best to check it out. Do you have Emphysema? Or on you have something else like a restrictive disease?

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Nikilet
Member

USA
48 Posts

Posted - Apr 29 2015 :  6:20:33 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I really try to do this when I get short of breath -- to breathe in through my nose to the count of 2 and then purse lips and blow out through my mouth to the count of 4 or more.

Maybe I was just experiencing nerves because I "dared" to raise my oxygen level without permission from the doctor. It could be because I do get nervous.

I have been so SOB for the last few months that I quit using my treadmill. I may try to go back on it and turn the oxygen up from 2 to 3 and see what happens with that.

[quote]Originally posted by PennyPA

Hyperventilating is when you breath in and out rapidly and therefore get very little CO2 out before you're taking your next breath in. So, if you think it's because you're hyperventilating, consciously slow your breathing and really concentrate on nice long exhales.
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PennyPA
Contributing Member

USA
5893 Posts

Posted - Apr 29 2015 :  6:26:47 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
You should be inhaling, roughly, to a count of 3 and exhaling to 6. A count of 2 just isn't going to get you very much O2 when you're exerting yourself. Of course, it all depends on how fast you're counting. Try 3 and 6 seconds.

****************************************************************
Do Not Regret Growing Older. It is a Privilege Denied to Many

You can’t change the past but you can ruin the present worrying about the future.

The Bad News: Time flies as you get older.
The Good News: You’re still the pilot.

Penny's Lung Volume Reduction Surgery

And Our Travel Blog After LVRS




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Sokcap48
Senior Member

USA
888 Posts

Posted - Apr 29 2015 :  8:04:06 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
If you count one-one thousand, two-one thousand that is in my opinion plenty of time to inhale then exhale at least four seconds. At least that works four me.
I tried to inhale a full four seconds and blew myself up . :-))

Paul-Ut
The Journey Continues.
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Nikilet
Member

USA
48 Posts

Posted - Apr 29 2015 :  8:31:04 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
To PennyPA and SoCap48: I tried the 3/6 ratio. I don't have any trouble with blowing out for 6 seconds, but it is a little hard for me to inhale through the nose for 3 seconds. I can do it if I really concentrate, but it doesn't come real naturally.

I can draw my exhalation out for 10 seconds with no problem. But the inhalation is the hard one for me.
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CarolCA
Contributing Member

USA
3366 Posts

Posted - Apr 29 2015 :  8:37:33 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'll make it even more confusing. I was told to inhale to 4 and exhale to 8.
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jmrommes
Contributing Member

1895 Posts

Posted - Apr 29 2015 :  9:04:40 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Whether you inhale to 4 and exhale to 8 or 3 and 6, doesn't really matter. You can do it 1 to 2.....just as long as your exhale is longer than your inhale. Ideally, you would do it 3 to 6 or 4 to 8, but if that's not possible, then just be sure your exhale is longer than your inhale.

Jean

Exercise not only lets me live, it enables me to have a life.
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Sokcap48
Senior Member

USA
888 Posts

Posted - Apr 30 2015 :  10:26:54 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Jean- right ON. I think we all are probably talking close to the same amount of time. We all count at a little different speed. I probably inhale close to 2 seconds but my exhale is probably closer to 5. I try to remember to get it all out..I think using the " one-one thousand" is a very accurate way of counting a true second. At least the is the way EMT's are trained but once agin what ever works for you. Exhale twice what we inhale.
PS. Thanks for all the info you bring to the forum. :-)

Paul-Ut
The Journey Continues.

Edited by - Sokcap48 on Apr 30 2015 10:36:46 AM
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DonnaB0216
Member

USA
95 Posts

Posted - Apr 30 2015 :  12:23:10 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
well geez, I think I told you guys when I first introduced myself that I was really a rotten doctor for myself! I didn't know the mentholatum might cause issues, I guess it's a good thing I lost my tube of it. I'm guessing I probably also need to lose the strong smelling ben gay type rubs in favor of one less odorifuos! I know my dachshund would appreciate that!

Donna
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PennyPA
Contributing Member

USA
5893 Posts

Posted - Apr 30 2015 :  5:19:23 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Donna, it doesn't matter if you rub either one elsewhere on your body...just not on or close to your face, is all.

Nikilet, you don't have to breathe in through your nose. Try breathing in through your mouth. The important part is the exhale...through pursed lips as if you're cooling soup on a spoon.

****************************************************************
Do Not Regret Growing Older. It is a Privilege Denied to Many

You can’t change the past but you can ruin the present worrying about the future.

The Bad News: Time flies as you get older.
The Good News: You’re still the pilot.

Penny's Lung Volume Reduction Surgery

And Our Travel Blog After LVRS




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fatpuppy
Member

175 Posts

Posted - Apr 30 2015 :  5:36:00 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by PennyPA

through pursed lips as if you're cooling soup on a spoon.



Smell the flowers; blow out the candles.
I threatened a nurse with physical harm if I heard that one more time! :)

“As democracy is perfected, the office of president represents, more and more closely, the inner soul of the people. On some great and glorious day the plain folks of the land will reach their heart’s desire at last and the White House will be adorned by a downright moron.” H.L.Mencken 1920
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Nikilet
Member

USA
48 Posts

Posted - Apr 30 2015 :  5:47:30 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Since I am receiving so much helpful information, I have another question. It's a little embarrassing but I'll ask it anyway. Whenever I have to go to the bathroom real bad, it affects my breathing ... Meaning, breathing becomes difficult. Is this normal or do I just have strange copd?
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PennyPA
Contributing Member

USA
5893 Posts

Posted - Apr 30 2015 :  9:16:45 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nope, that is normal, Nikilet. So is losing control, usually of urine, when you're very sob.

You're right, fatpuppy. You don't want blow out the candles because that's a short, fast burst of exhale. As you know, you want a long, slow, complete exhale.

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Rita1
Senior Member

543 Posts

Posted - May 01 2015 :  6:19:14 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
[i]Originally by Penny

Nikilet, you don't have to breathe in through your nose. Try breathing in through your mouth. The important part is the exhale...through pursed lips as if you're cooling soup on a spoon.



I beg to disagree. :) Breathing through the nose is very important. The nose does more than hold your glasses so, if you can control your breathing enough to use your nose, use it because...

1) the mucus and hairs in the nose, clean dirt from the air to keep it out of your lungs. The mixture of mucus and dirt in the nose is commonly known as "boogers." :)

2) since the opening in the back of the nose is further from the lungs than the one at the back of the mouth and since there is mucus in the nose and since there are sinuses, air coming into the lungs is warmer than that coming through the mouth. I suppose it wouldn't matter if the air we breathe is the same temp as our lungs but most of us are not breathing 98.7 plus degrees air.

3) because the nose can smell and the mouth can't, the nose warns us if there is something in the air we are inhaling that we don't want in our lungs. Like secondhand smoke. Or perfume.


As for pursed lips, if you pretend blow on soup, your mouth is wider than it is if you pretend blow out a candle. It is also more gentle imo. Candle out blowing is more pursed, like a kiss. I don't know if it matters but there is a difference.

Rita
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