COPD Support Discussion Boards Active Users: 165 / Visits Today: 1395
Highest Active Users: 353
COPD Support Discussion Boards
Home | Profile | Register | Active Topics | Members | Search | FAQ
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

 All Forums
 COPD Forums
 COPD Support - COPD Information
 COPD Support News December 7, 2007
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  

Dave-OH
Administrator

USA
4016 Posts

Posted - Dec 10 2007 :  9:53:32 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Volume 7, Issue 52
December 7, 2007

DEFINITION OF PRESCRIPTION ABBREVIATIONS
A prescription, as is well known, is a physician's order for the preparation
and administration of a drug or device for a patient. What may be less well
known is that a prescription has several parts:

The superscription (or heading) with the symbol R or Rx which stands for the
word Recipe, meaning (in Latin) to take; The inscription which contains the
names and quantities of the ingredients; The subscription or directions for
compounding the drug; and The signature which is often preceded by the sign
s. standing for signa, mark, giving the directions to be marked on the
container. You may see some chickenscrawl marks on a prescription. For
example, b.i.d. It means twice (two times) a day and is an abbreviation for
"bis in die" which in Latin means, not too surprisingly, twice a day. It is
one of a number of hallowed abbreviations of Latin terms that have been
traditionally used in prescriptions to specify the frequency with which
medicines should be taken. Some of the abbreviations of terms commonly used
in prescriptions with their meanings are:

a.c. = before meals (from "ante cibum," before meals)
ad lib: use as much as one desires (from "ad libitum")
da or daw = dispense as written
p.c. = after meals (from "post cibum," after meals)
p.o. = by mouth, orally (from "per os," by mouth)
Other definitions at:
http://www.medterms.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=5033

ALSO IN THIS ISSUE
-NYT EXAMINES COPD
-*CQRC STATEMENT ON THE NY TIMES ARTICLE ON MEDICARE'S HOME OXYGEN BENEFIT
-RESEARCHERS FOCUS ON GENES AND INFLAMMATION IN SEARCH FOR CLUES TO COPD
-DON'T LET GERMS BE YOUR TRAVEL COMPANIONS
-RESPIRATORY THERAPY CAVE
-HEAVY BREATHING PROTEINS
-STUDY DEMONSTRATES *RAMELTON DOES NOT EXACERBATE RESPIRATORY DEPRESSANT
EFFECTS
-ALMIRALL TAKES ON COPD
-HATS OFF TO COMBAT ASTHMA
-ADVANCES IN DIAGNOSTICS CAN LEAD TO BETTER QUALITY OF LIFE
-AMARILLO BIOSCIENCES FILES PATENT APPLICATION TO TREAT CHRONIC COUGH WITH
ORAL INTERFERON
-FDA INVESIGATES ANTI-SMOKING DRUGS
-IBUPROFEN SLOWS LOSS OF LUNG FUNCTION IN CYSTIC FIBROSIS
-MISCELLANEOUS

~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<
SOURCES: News items summarized in The COPD-NEWS are taken from secondary
sources believed to be reliable. However, the COPD Family of Services does
not verify their accuracy.
~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<

NYT EXAMINES COPD
And thanks to all of you who called the series to my attention. The New York
Times examined COPD, as part of a series on the six leading causes of
illness and death. COPD can occur as emphysema, which "destroys air sacs
deep in the lungs," and chronic bronchitis, which "causes inflammation,
congestion and scarring in the airways," according to the Times.

Questions were asked and answered as part of the series. Here's one I though
particularly appropriate:

Q: What are the criteria for giving someone oxygen (outside immediate crisis
situations, as a day-to-day thing)? I liked the mention in the article about
someone using oxygen during exercise (in rehab?). But I’ve also heard that
oxygen is a last resort, to be avoided as long as possible. Seeing someone
struggle makes me think oxygen would be a good thing, but this is probably
not the whole story? — Posted by Maroon

A. Oxygen is not a last resort. It is a tremendously important therapy that
can help those C.O.P.D. patients whose oxygen levels are too low. Two
clinical trials in the early 1980s demonstrated that long-term oxygen
therapy substantially decreases mortality among people with C.O.P.D. with
severely reduced oxygen levels. Medicare has followed those guidelines for
many years and will cover oxygen use in those who meet the criteria. Using
oxygen during exercise can help keep oxygen levels in a safe range and allow
more and more effective exercise. The NHLBI (National Heart, Lung, and Blood
Institute) is starting a new oxygen trial to determine if oxygen could
benefit people with C.O.P.D. with less severely reduced oxygen levels. —
Posted by Dr. Byron Thomashow
http://science.blogs.nytimes.com/2007/11/28/readers-questions-copd/

*CQRC STATEMENT ON THE NY TIMES ARTICLE ON MEDICARE'S HOME OXYGEN BENEFIT
The New York Times story on home oxygen therapy omits salient facts about
home oxygen therapy and the critical role it plays in keeping some of
Medicare's sickest beneficiaries in their own homes as they manage the
effects of debilitating and irreversible lung disease. The story
inappropriately treats home oxygen therapy as though it is nothing more than
the rental of inert equipment, when in fact home oxygen is a prescribed
therapy, that when properly administered, requires both medical devices and
myriad patient services. Oxygen providers deliver critical services that
help this oft-overlooked beneficiary segment manage their chronic disease
and therapy between physician visits, which in turn helps to avoid costly
hospital admissions, serious complications, and sometimes even death. Home
oxygen providers are often the physician's eyes and ears in the patient's
home setting. *Council for Quality Respiratory Care
http://sev.prnewswire.com/health-care-hospitals/20071130/DC0866930112007-1.html

RESEARCHERS FOCUS ON GENES AND INFLAMMATION IN SEARCH FOR CLUES TO COPD
By DENISE GRADY: Two big ideas dominate the latest thinking about COPD: one,
genes determine who develops it, and two, it involves systemic inflammation
that affects far more than the lungs...Genetics may explain why only about
20 percent of smokers ever get C.O.P.D... researchers think the lungs of
some people have an inherited sensitivity to smoke.
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/29/health/29geneside.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

DON'T LET GERMS BE YOUR TRAVEL COMPANIONS
Surely you've seen them: the growing legions of germ-aware folks who use a
paper towel to open public restroom doorknobs and won't sit on a public
toilet seat without some sort of paper guard. As the holidays approach, you
may want to stop making fun of these people, and start following their lead,
especially if you are one of the millions of people who are planning on
flying this season...a recent study in the Journal of Environmental Health
Research shows that you are 100% more likely to catch a cold while flying
than when going about your normal routine. So, what's the intrepid traveler
to do to avoid arriving at Aunt Ida's with the flu? Here are some tips:

-Exit, stage left. Ask for a seat in the exit row. Not only will you have
more leg room, but a sneeze can travel up to three feet, and the exit row
will provide a safe zone. The second best option is to choose a seat up
front in the plane because the air is fresher (not much fresher, but inside
of a sardine can, you take what you can get). Most important, you want to
avoid sitting within six to eight rows of the bathroom at all costs.

-Beware the bathroom. According to Charles Gerba, Ph.D., a microbiologist at
the University of Arizona, airplane bathrooms are "a disaster." In all of
the studies he's performed, E. coli has been present in "huge
concentrations" on every airplane bathroom on every surface, including the
faucet, the door, and the sink. Since the measly drip of water doesn't
adequately clean your hands because it shuts off every three seconds,
experts recommend that you wash your hands and then use an instant hand
sanitizer.

-Give your tray table a wipe. Besides the bathroom, tray tables are one of
the most contaminated surfaces on commercial planes.

-Pack your own pillow. If the flight attendant offers you a pillow or
blanket, say "Thanks, but no thanks."

-Your nose knows. The humidity on most commercial airliners is about 10
percent or lower, which dries out your nose and throat, making them more
susceptible to invaders. To keep mucous membranes well-lubricated, drink
lots of fluids .

-Keep track of your hands. Hand-washing is the number one thing you can do
to minimize your risk of getting sick, since every surface in the plane has
been touched by or hacked on by at least 50 other people. Also try to avoid
touching your face with your hands.

-Don't worry; be happy. Studies show that happy people get sick less often,
so sit back, ignore the cacophony of sneezes from 22C, and enjoy your
flight.

A bit more on the subject at:
http://www.healthcentral.com/allergy/c/75378/16611/dont-germs-travel?ic=6004

RESPIRATORY THERAPY CAVE
Editor's note: I am not recommending that any one embrace this RT's
theories on inhalers. He presents a different slant, which is why I am
including the link to his blog spot.

Rescue bronchodilators: The following are some questions real patients have
asked me recently regarding rescue bronchodilators. The answers here are my
humble personal and professional opinions and nothing more. Keep in mind
that your doctor might disagree with me, and that's fine. He can overrule me
whenever he wants. But, the answers here are based not just on my 10 years
as an RT, but over 30 years as a chronic asthmatic who's abused more than
his share of inhalers and lived to tell about it. Q and A at:
http://respiratorytherapycave.blogspot.com/2007/11/q-and-about-albuterol.html

HEAVY BREATHING PROTEINS
COPD: This disease is, in reality, a set of multiple conditions that
includes emphysema and chronic bronchitis. Sufferers experience coughing and
breathlessness. COPD is usually caused by smoking and for this reason it is
often considered as a self-inflicted disease. "Stop smoking and the symptoms
will abate." That is true to some extent but for the elderly and the
severely affected it can be too late to have any real effect. In emphysema,
the walls between the tiny air sacs in the lungs are destroyed, leading to a
smaller number of large sacs that are unable to exchange oxygen and carbon
dioxide efficiently. As a result, insufficient oxygen circulates around the
body. With chronic bronchitis, the airways in the lungs become inflamed and
thickened and excessive mucus is produced, contributing to coughing and
breathing difficulties.

Although much is known about COPD, the molecular basis of the disease and
the mechanisms that govern its initiation and progression are poorly
understood. In a new approach, researchers in Italy and the USA have
assessed the suitability of proteomics methods to try and identify changes
in protein expression that are related to the disease pathophysiology. They
analyzed sputum from people affected by COPD to different degrees and
compared the protein profiles to pick out potential biomarkers.

A total of 203 proteins were identified...Many proteins had been identified
previously in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) but 118 were detected for
the first time that had not been found in earlier studies of sputum... In
total, 14 proteins displayed differential expression across the five disease
groups. Closer examination of their functions will give clinicians a clearer
understanding of the disease while a broader study of their frequency could
help to establish a panel of proteins as biomarkers for the different stages
of COPD.
http://www.spectroscopynow.com/coi/cda/detail.cda?id=17663&type=Feature&chId=10&page=1

STUDY DEMONSTRATES *RAMELTON DOES NOT EXACERBATE RESPIRATORY DEPRESSANT
EFFECTS
A new study showed that ramelteon did not exacerbate respiratory depressant
effects in patients (40 years and older) with moderate to severe COPD, as
measured by oxygenation or abnormal breathing events relative to placebo.
Results of this double-blind, placebo-controlled trial were presented at the
53rd International Respiratory Congress of the American Association for
Respiratory Care.

"Getting adequate sleep is essential to maintaining health in people who
live with COPD. These results suggest that ramelteon is a sleep medication
that can be used safely in adults suffering from moderate to severe COPD who
are concerned with breathing impairment during sleep," said Thomas Roth,
PhD, director, Henry Ford Sleep Research and Disorders Center. "While
traditional sleep aids can negatively affect respiration during sleep in
patients with COPD, this study demonstrated that ramelteon does not produce
such respiratory depressant effects."..."Patients with COPD...must take
extreme care in ensuring they receive enough oxygen at all times,
particularly when sleeping. Other medications used for insomnia may reduce
upper airway muscle tone, which can lead to increased hypoxemia," said Dr.
Roth. "This study shows that there was no difference in blood oxygen
saturation all night between placebo and ramelteon."

People with COPD have few options for treating insomnia because the
traditional sleep medications cause a sedative effect that can further
depress respiration. Studies for severe COPD have not yet been evaluated by
the FDA.

*Ramelteon (ram-EL-tee-on) belongs to the group of medicines called central
nervous system (CNS) depressants (medicines that slow down the nervous
system).
http://www.earthtimes.org/articles/show/news_press_release,234796.shtml

ALMIRALL TAKES ON COPD
By Anna Lewcock: Spanish firm Almirall is working on a new COPD treatment
combined with a hi-tech easy use inhaler, creating what it hopes will be
another competitive product from its in-house pipeline. Almirall presented
the lead respiratory candidate at its R&D day in Barcelona, with the
aclidinium bromide compound hailed as the cornerstone of the firm's
respiratory franchise. Last year the Spanish firm signed a deal with US
company Forest Laboratories to develop, market and distribute the
long-acting muscarinic antagonist in the US, and hopes to be able to launch
the product in the EU by 2010.

The aclidinium inhalable product is intended as a long-term, once daily
maintenance treatment of bronchospasm associated with COPD. According to
Almirall, it offers advantages over existing products in terms of side
effect profile, as well as the novel dry powder inhaler (DPI) administration
route. The drug is currently being evaluated in a total of 17 studies, with
a further 10 trials underway, two of which are in Phase III. Results thus
far have been very promising. Aclidinium was found to be a high affinity M3
receptor agonist, with significant and long-acting bronchodilatory effects
in patients with COPD. The compound itself hydrolyses rapidly in human
plasma and therefore has a short half life of less than 15 minutes, a key
factor in reducing the chances of systemic side effects. Other
anticholinergic COPD treatments, such as tiotropium or ipratropium, can last
for hours or even days in the body, increasing the likelihood of these
unwanted side effects. While aclidinium may vanish from plasma very rapidly,
therapeutic benefit in the lungs is also very quick, with onset of action
within 15 minutes and lasting for 24 hours.

Almirall is pursuing a three-line strategy for aclidinium bromide. It is
being developed initially as a once-daily monotherapy for first-line
maintenance therapy in COPD and will be filed with regulators for this
indication in 2009. It is also in phase II trials in a fixed-dose
combination with the long-acting beta agonist formoterol. This is expected
to be filed in 2011. Additionally, it is at a preclinical development stage
as a fixed-dose combination with an inhaled corticosteroid which could be
ready to file in 2012.
http://www.in-pharmatechnologist.com/news/ng.asp?n=81787-almirall-forest-laboratories-copd-respiratory-inhaler

~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<
COMMERCIAL FREE: We do not accept any paid advertising. Any corporations,
products, medicines (prescription or non) mentioned in this newsletter are
for informational purposes only and not to be construed as an endorsement or
condemnation of same.
~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<

HATS OFF TO COMBAT ASTHMA
Two University of Nottingham studies exploring the causes and treatment of
asthma and COPD could lead to the development of drugs to battle these
debilitating conditions. Researchers will explore histone acetyl transferase
(HAT) inhibitors in asthma and COPD. This study will investigate a bank of
plant extracts at the University of Strathclyde, seeking compounds that
could combat the intercellular processes that result in the symptoms of
asthma and COPD — inflammation of the airways which can lead to coughing,
breathlessness and increased chest infections. Though they are different
diseases, asthma and COPD affect the human body in a similar way. In asthma,
allergens irritate the lungs, in COPD, this is done by cigarette smoke. This
irritation inflames the sufferer’s airways, which the muscles then close,
creating a narrowing effect.

Research done at the University over the past 15 years has found that the
muscle layer in the airway is more complex than has traditionally been
thought. As well as going into spasm during asthma and COPD attacks the
muscle layer produces a wide range of mediators and cytokines — proteins
that act as chemical signalers when it comes into contact with allergens or
cigarette smoke. In asthma and COPD sufferers, these proteins are produced
by stimulation of airway muscle cell walls in the lungs, releasing
intracellular signaling proteins called ‘transcription factors’ which alter
the DNA of the cell and activate messenger RNA. It is these ‘transcription
factors’ which activate the inflammation by causing release of mediators and
cytokines.

By exploring plant extracts that may reduce the activation of HATs within
airway cells, the researchers may isolate compounds that could be used to
suppress inflammation in respiratory disease. Any drug successfully
synthesised from such compounds could potentially revolutionise the
treatment of respiratory disease. There is also the potential to treat other
inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and Inflammatory Bowel
Disease.
http://www.physorg.com/news115984431.html

ADVANCES IN DIAGNOSTICS CAN LEAD TO BETTER QUALITY OF LIFE
COPD is an umbrella disorder, encompassing emphysema, chronic bronchitis and
several less prevalent diseases. According to Arthur Sung, MD, the Director
of Interventional Pulmonology at New York Methodist Hospital and one of the
foremost experts in the field, new technologies are key to earlier
diagnoses, which can lead to treatment options that can slow the progression
of the disease. " The most devastating disease within the COPD
classification is emphysema, which is characterized by the loss of
elasticity in the fibers of the lung's tissue and the collapse of small air
sacs called alveoli, making inhaling - and particularly exhaling - labored
and difficult. However, new, minimally invasive interventional pulmonology
techniques on the horizon and in clinical investigational stages, such as
creating airway bypass to improve ventilation and optimize lung mechanics,
are holding promise for patients who have long suffered the ill-effects of
COPD.
http://www.prweb.com/releases/2007/12/prweb573899.htm

~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<
MEDICAL DECISIONS. Your physician should be consulted on all medical
decisions. New procedures or drugs should not be started or stopped without
such consultation. While we believe that our accumulated experience has
value, and a unique perspective, you must accept it for what it is...the
work of COPD patients. We vigorously encourage individuals with COPD to take
an active part in the management of their disease. They do this through
education and by sharing information and thoughts with their primary
physician and pulmonologist. However, medical decisions are based on complex
medical principles and should be left to the medical practitioner who has
been trained to diagnose and advise.
~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<

AMARILLO BIOSCIENCES FILES PATENT APPLICATION TO TREAT CHRONIC COUGH WITH
ORAL INTERFERON
Amarillo Biosciences, Inc. announced that it has filed a patent application
with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office with claims to methods of treating
chronic coughing by administering interferon orally to diminish cough
duration, frequency and intensity . Although the examples in the patent
application described a method of treating idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and
Sjogren’s syndrome, it is claimed that interferon will reduce coughing in
many disease conditions, including COPD. A study to confirm the efficacy of
oral interferon in the treatment of chronic cough will be launched in
January at a major Texas university. This Phase 2, double-blind,
placebo-controlled trial of 40 COPD patients is expected to be completed in
mid 2008.
http://www.businesswire.com/portal/site/google/index.jsp?ndmViewId=news_view&newsId=20071204005814&newsLang=en

IBUPROFEN SLOWS LOSS OF LUNG FUNCTION IN CYSTIC FIBROSIS
By Charles Bankhead , Staff Writer, MedPage Today. High-dose ibuprofen
significantly slows the decline in lung function in patients with cystic
fibrosis, investigators found, providing real-world confirmation of
controlled trial data. Daily therapy for as long as seven years slowed
deterioration in lung function by 29% compared with declines faced by
patients who did not receive ibuprofen, Michael Konstan, M.D., of Case
Western Reserve University and colleagues reported in the December issue of
the American Journal of "The apparent benefits of ibuprofen therapy outweigh
the small risk of gastrointestinal bleeding," Dr. Konstan and colleagues
concluded. The study was supported by the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and the
National Institutes of Health. Dr. Konstan disclosed financial relationships
with Genentech, Chiron, and Novartis.
http://www.medpagetoday.com/Pediatrics/GeneralPediatrics/dh/7541

FDA INVESIGATES ANTI-SMOKING DRUGS
Scientists working for the government are currently investigating a drug
that is meant to help smokers quit cigarettes. In recent months it has been
speculated that the drug may increases thoughts of suicide and provoke
violent behavior in those who take it. The FDA announced earlier this week
that they had received reports of patients experiencing mood disorders and
having erratic behavior when taking Chantix. Chantix is a medication
manufactured by Pfizer Inc. Although the reports are still fairly new, the
FDA says they are gathering information and advising doctors to closely
monitor patients who are taking Chantix. FDA officials say that health care
physicians and patients should be on the lookout for severe mood swings and
strange behavior. (Source: CNNMoney)
http://www.adrugrecall.com/news/chantix-investigation.html

~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<
JOIN US? Subscription to this Newsletter is free and we hope that it serves
your needs. For more Newsletter information, go to:
http://copd-support.com/signup-news.html

The Newsletter, like all the other endeavors of the Family of COPD Support
Programs, is provided to you by COPD-Support, Inc. a non-profit
member organization with IRS designation 501(c)(3). If you would like to be
involved and help us provide these programs to the individuals who
benefit from them, please consider joining us as a member. Further
information is available at:
http://copd-support.com/membership.html
~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<>~<

MISCELLANEOUS
Six White Boomers
Forget Rudoph. Have an Australian Christmas.
http://www.youtube.com/v/hlSsffF2xhA&rel=1

Click here: Winters Of Long Ago
http://www.greatdanepro.com/Winters%20Long%20Ago/index.htm

Happy Holidays from Rail Europe
Choose your destination-I couldn't resist. Had to visit all of them.
http://downloads.raileurope.com/holidayCard/06_christmas_card.html

I Ain't Got a Barrel of Money
http://www.frontiernet.net/~jimdandy/specials/dearfriends/dearfriends.htm

Blue Christmas
http://www.mamarocks.com/blue_christmas.htm

Merry Christmas
http://www.riversongs.com/ecards/merry_christmas.html

Christmas Game
Shoot with the Left Mouse button
http://www.riversongs.com/egreetings/christmasgame.html

Star Shuffle
Celebrity Scramble Puzzle
http://club.live.com/images/gameimages/ElvisLivesSplashScreen.jpg

Until next Friday,

Joan Costello, Editor
Jadece@rcn.com

Dave, Forum Administrator
COPD Support, Inc. http://www.copd-support.com/
Your source for peer support and COPD Info

Chat room http://chat.copd-support.com
Mobile chat room for pads and phone Chat room http://chat.copd-support.com/m

My Site: http://lungresources.com
  Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Jump To:
COPD Support Discussion Boards © Copyright COPD-Support, Inc. Go To Top Of Page
Snitz Forums 2000