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Gerry-FL
Rookie

USA
7 Posts

Posted - Mar 13 2017 :  10:28:52 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I am asking for other folks experience. I have used an Invacare XPO2 for two years now. The first unit lasted one year, and the second unit just started dying. I understand that this is common for this model. I'd love to hear of other people's experiences with all POCs. I previously owned an Inogen one G2 that worked fine but was too large for my use. Please tell me your experiences with these machines.
Gerry

"I want to go quietly in my sleep like Uncle Amos. Not screaming and yelling like his passengers."

tsainta
Contributing Member

USA
1548 Posts

Posted - Mar 14 2017 :  12:56:29 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have heard a number of times that the "designer size" POCs from all manufacturers have short life spans, but maybe even more importantly that their seive beds (the filter mediums that produce oxygen) typically need replacement in a year or so. Reliable oxygen production and convenience may be mutually exclusive in POCs.

Tony-CA

The statistics on sanity say that one out of every four persons is suffering from some sort of mental illness. Think of your three best friends. Are they're OK? Then it's you.
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Sokcap48
Senior Member

USA
751 Posts

Posted - Mar 14 2017 :  7:29:48 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I think you will find if you buy a larger unit they will last longer for you. JMHO I had a Simply Go that I used extensively for four years and it still is working.

Paul-Ut
The Journey Continues.
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Zellie
Member

USA
38 Posts

Posted - Mar 15 2017 :  10:22:40 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have the Oxlife. I purchased it 5 years ago. The sieves were replaced at 3 years while under warranty. The company shipped me a new replacement while it was being repaired, all at no cost to me. It goes up to 3 continous or pulse dose up to 5 or 6.

Zell
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jmrommes
Contributing Member

1600 Posts

Posted - Mar 15 2017 :  11:57:51 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
To tell us the settings doesn't mean anything. Three continuous means something, but unless you include the mL per minute and the breaths per minute, there's no basis for comparison to any other system, nor is there any way to determine whether that machine will adequately oxygenate you on a pulse setting. Even with that information, it's still imperative that people choosing a machine have a chance to actually use it and put it through its paces from very light usage (sitting on a plane, for instance) to really heavy usage (hauling groceries into the kitchen from the garage). If you don't, you run the risk that you'll have spent a good deal of money on a system that won't work for you.

Exercise not only lets me live, it enables me to have a life.
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tsainta
Contributing Member

USA
1548 Posts

Posted - Mar 15 2017 :  1:07:53 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The Oxlife Independence is a "pull-along" POC that weighs 19lbs. It can produce 3LPM continuous and 96ml pulse dose.

Tony-CA

The statistics on sanity say that one out of every four persons is suffering from some sort of mental illness. Think of your three best friends. Are they're OK? Then it's you.
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jmrommes
Contributing Member

1600 Posts

Posted - Mar 15 2017 :  3:48:15 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Tony, that's good information and allows people to see how different the OxLife is from a Simply go or any of the Inogen machines. For instance, my Inogen One G2, which is the workhorse of the Inogens, doesn't produce continuous at all, and the max bolus is 84 ml pulse dose assuming that I only breathe 15 times a minute, so in practicality, I'm probably getting less than 70 ml. The comparison is easy.

Exercise not only lets me live, it enables me to have a life.
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Zellie
Member

USA
38 Posts

Posted - Mar 15 2017 :  4:03:01 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I had tried the Simply Go which just didn't keep my stats up when walking. But I am happy with the Oxlife but I need help when going out and it needs to be lifted into the car or on stairs. I wish they could make a lighter poc that would do a real 3L continuous.

Zell
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tsainta
Contributing Member

USA
1548 Posts

Posted - Mar 15 2017 :  4:04:41 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Best--and maybe only easy--source of POC performance info is the annual Pulmonary Paper survey of POCs. The last in the May/June 2016 issue. Website: https://www.pulmonarypaper.org/

Tony-CA

The statistics on sanity say that one out of every four persons is suffering from some sort of mental illness. Think of your three best friends. Are they're OK? Then it's you.
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Gerry-FL
Rookie

USA
7 Posts

Posted - Mar 16 2017 :  6:39:20 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Apparently there is a fee to get info from the pulmonary paper link, but I found this one online that appears to be very useful. http://www.copdfoundation.org/Downloads/POC-Final.pdf I'd still like to hear as much real world experience on this subject as possible.

Gerry

"I want to go quietly in my sleep like Uncle Amos. Not screaming and yelling like his passengers."
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jmrommes
Contributing Member

1600 Posts

Posted - Mar 16 2017 :  8:50:54 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
There is a fee of $25.00, but that gets you a years subscription and six of Ryan Diesem's columns. That by itself is worth it to me! It's also the only place where you will find the same kind of comparison from year to year. You can't look at last year's comparisons and be sure the machines are exactly as they were described then; manufacturers change things up. By getting each issue, you ensure that you will have the most recent information. If you look at the one from the Foundation, it's four years old now and there are at least three new machines I know of that aren't on the list.

Exercise not only lets me live, it enables me to have a life.

Edited by - jmrommes on Mar 16 2017 8:53:29 PM
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tsainta
Contributing Member

USA
1548 Posts

Posted - Mar 17 2017 :  2:14:14 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Gerry, the link you provided lists a good deal of information for the covered POCs, but in my view it has a significant shortcoming. It does not disclose the maximum oxygen output per minute for the smaller--intermittant or pulse flow only--POCs. It also does not cover some newer models.

I appreciate your desire to hear real world experience, but real world experience can be misleading unless you are confident you are hearing it from a person with COPD that is as advanced as your own. If you need 3LPM of oxygen, it is meaningless that someone who needs 2LPM of oxygen is satisfied with a particular POC. You need to match POC capacity to your own requirement for oxygen. And, since COPD is a progressive disease, it might be prudent to get a POC with excess capacity in order to delay the time you would have to buy a higher capacity model.

Tony-CA

The statistics on sanity say that one out of every four persons is suffering from some sort of mental illness. Think of your three best friends. Are they're OK? Then it's you.
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jmrommes
Contributing Member

1600 Posts

Posted - Mar 17 2017 :  3:57:56 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Gerry, what Tony's saying is "real world experience". Because we've been through this process, and some of us have made expensive mistakes, we know that the only way to really know whether a POC will meet your needs is for you to give it a major test lasting several days and using it in all sorts of situations that represent the kind of use you'd put it to. You need to exercise with it, sit with it, walk down the street to the neighbor's with it, chase the dog with it, haul in groceries with it, etc. And you need to use your oximeter doing all those things because if you don't, you'll have no idea whether it will really keep you oxygenated. That's our real world experience.

Exercise not only lets me live, it enables me to have a life.
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tsainta
Contributing Member

USA
1548 Posts

Posted - Mar 17 2017 :  8:22:04 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Exactly, Jean.

Tony-CA

The statistics on sanity say that one out of every four persons is suffering from some sort of mental illness. Think of your three best friends. Are they're OK? Then it's you.
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Gerry-FL
Rookie

USA
7 Posts

Posted - Mar 18 2017 :  9:39:21 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
From a practical standpoint I don't see how I can try out various models myself. That's why I was asking for other people's experience. In regard to the lightweight models there doesn't seem to be much variation in performance, but there is probably major variations in longevity and noise level for instance. As to total capability, the info is there it just requires a little study. For instance my current Invacare XPO2 in the chart is listed as having fixed minute volume technology. That means that if you breathe faster than it can keep up it will deliver smaller Bolus. From the chart I see it is capable of delivering 42mLs per breath at 20 bpm. That works out to 840mLs per minute or .84 lpm. If you use the concept that you breathe in for the same length of time you breathe out, then a continuous flow bottle set for 2 lpm is actually giving you 1 lpm since half of the flow is wasted. In short, the continuous flow in this example is providing only a small amount more useful oxygen than than the POC. Then Inogen One G3 which is generally well regarded from what I can tell, produces a maximum bolus size of 49.4 at 20bpm. That works out to 980 mls per minute or almost identical to the useful output from a continuous 2 lpm. Since I know that the XPO2 is capable of meeting my needs when it is working, I can be pretty sure that the Inogen One G3 would also. It is not available in my area for insurance coverage. The Oxygo models I have no info on but they ARE available in my area. There may be other possibilities but it's really hard to get info.
Gerry

"I want to go quietly in my sleep like Uncle Amos. Not screaming and yelling like his passengers."
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tsainta
Contributing Member

USA
1548 Posts

Posted - Mar 18 2017 :  11:10:31 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Gerry, good analysis. Sorry you haven't received any feedback on model-specific durability from users on this board.

Tony-CA

The statistics on sanity say that one out of every four persons is suffering from some sort of mental illness. Think of your three best friends. Are they're OK? Then it's you.
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